Isaiah

THE HOLY PROPHET

With some of the most inspiring and imagery-dense prophetic words in the Bible, you are going to love the book of Isaiah. Isaiah prophesies to the kings of Israel, warning them of the coming exile if they continue in their rebellion. Did they listen? No, they didn’t! And poor Isaiah walks into exile with the nation he tried to warn. But wait, it doesn’t end there! In Isaiah 40, the book turns and he prophecies again, but this time it’s comfort for the future and how God is going to restore Israel. Get involved and fall in love with the prophetic gift as you study the book of Isaiah.

 

PART ONE | PART TWO | PART THREE

 
 

 

Part One

I SAW THE LORD SEATED ON A THRONE, HIGH AND EXALTED, AND THE TRAIN OF HIS ROBE FILLED THE TEMPLE

I 6:1


DIVE

FLYING OFF THE HANDLE WITHOUT ALL THE FACTS

I remember when I was young in God, I was forever reading a verse (completely out of context) and flying off the handle with God for being ‘judgemental’ or ‘unforgiving’ or ‘a mean, nasty God that doesn’t love us!’ I can imagine God patiently waiting for the day that I would grow up, read the whole story of the Bible, stop taking bits out of context and accusing Him of things that were simply untrue. All because I reacted without having all the facts. Have you ever had a conversation with someone where they flew off in a fit of rage without letting you finish the story or explain yourself? You want to grab them and say ‘let me finish and you might change your mind about having this hissy fit!’ Imagine how God feels!

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DEEP DIVE | DR KYLE KEIMER

A DEEP DIVE INTO ISAIAH

How do we dive into the book of Isaiah, one of the most theologically significant and complex books of the Bible? Well, before we become daunted about reading 66 chapters, we find a nice summary statement of the key messages of judgment and hope that run throughout the book in Isa 1. It is a chapter that looks backwards and is full of references and allusions to earlier biblical passages (e.g. Lev 26, Deut 28), and it is a chapter that looks to the future. Significantly, Isa 1 is the present experience of a future possibility that was detailed in Deut 32. Deut 32 is a warning to Israel about what will happen if they break their covenant with God; Isa 1 is written shortly after the Neo-Assyrian Empire has decimated the Kingdom of Judah in 701 B.C as a result of this lack of covenant keeping.

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Part Two

BUT THOSE WHO HOPE IN THEIR STRENGTH. THEY WILL SOAR ON WINGS LIKE EAGLES

I 40:31


DIVE

FORGET WALLY, FIND JESUS

As you read Isaiah, there is a beautiful thread of prophecy that runs throughout the whole book. The prophecy appears in both sections; the first section of judgement and the second section of comfort. The beautiful thread that Isaiah prophesies is the coming of the Messiah, Jesus Christ. We have the great advantage of reading this book on this side of the cross, so we get to read knowing how Jesus came and what took place. As you read Isaiah, I want you to discover Jesus and highlight the verses that prophesy His coming. He is not dressed in a stripy red and white shirt with a cute red cap, but I can guarantee you won’t miss Him.


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DEEP DIVE

THE MOUNTAINTOP | EUON FAM

Let it be said that it is truly a daunting task for any reader to embark on the long and harrowing journey that is reading the Book of Isaiah. It’s sixty-six chapters, at times, feel like a relentless onslaught of prophetic judgement and declaration and there are few clear markers left by Isaiah to aid in navigating his writings. Without the appropriate preparation, it is understandable that this book may turn many readers away and leave them feeling as if there is little to be gained by persevering. But to leave this book by the wayside is a mistake. Although it is a challenging read, it holds the potential of providing a unique glimpse into the enormous scope of the sovereign plans of God. Isaiah alone is quoted more times in the New Testament than all of other Old Testament prophets put together. When Jesus declares Himself the Messiah in the synagogue in Nazareth, He reads from Isaiah 61:1-2 (Luke 4:18). The famous passage of the suffering servant, one of the most significant prophecies about Jesus, comes from Isaiah 52 and 53. It is without argument that these writings carry a unique significance and command a certain degree of attention and examination. So with all that being said – our purpose here will be to begin laying a foundation so that we can better understand and interpret Isaiah’s powerful message.

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Part Three

THE SPIRIT OF THE SOVEREIGN LORD IS ON ME BECAUSE THE LORD HAS ANOINTED ME TO PROCLAIM GOOD NEWS TO THE POOR

I 61:1


DIVE

IF YOU’RE HAPPY WHERE YOU ARE, DON’T READ ISAIAH!

If you are reading this post with the TYB schedule, you’ll be finishing the year with the Book of Isaiah and we have designed the schedule with that purpose. We want you to finish on a book that lifts your head – Isaiah will encourage you to arise, to think bigger about God and His plans, to stir yourself again that the future is great and is safely and securely in the hands of our awesome God. So if you want to stay where you are, don’t read Isaiah. That is the thing about the prophetic books in the Bible, they will declare good things into bad situations, cause you to change the way you think about your circumstances and God, cause you to have faith when things haven’t changed, and cause you to arise and see a big future even when you don’t feel like it.


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DEEP DIVE

ISAIAH | DR KYLE KEIMER

Who wrote the book called Isaiah, and for whom was it written? The traditional ascription of the book to the eighth century prophet, Isaiah son of Amoz, has fallen out of fashion in the present scholarly atmosphere though there are still those who make cases for the unity of the book and its ascription to the historical Isaiah. More popular, however, is the view that multiple authors — how many is a debate — composed the book called Isaiah and that this book was written over a period of at least two hundred years, from the eighth century BC to the sixth. Part of this latter view is that various Judaic communities, from Judah and Babylon, contributed to the book; additional later redactions were made, but by the second century BC it had been standardized for the most part (cf. Ecclus 48:17-25). One later Rabbinic tradition sees Hezekiah and his colleagues as the authors of Isaiah (Bava Batra 15a), though this tradition paralleled the otherwise accepted idea of a single eighth century prophet as the author.

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